Define sedating

An IV access line is set in place for fluid replacement and injection of medications.

A history is usually taken to assess risk and choice of medication.

Sedation is also used extensively in the intensive care unit so that patients who are being ventilated tolerate having an endotracheal tube in their trachea.

Sedation methods in dentistry include inhalation sedation (using nitrous oxide), oral sedation, and intravenous (IV) sedation.Inhalation sedation is also sometimes referred to as relative analgesia.This means that if the patient has not had time to metabolize the previous dose and ingests more, then the sedative effect may increase.Because of these additive effects, these medications taken with other sedatives or alcohol (also a sedative hypnotic drug) may increase chances for accidental death.Additionally, sedation is often desirable to diminish fear associated with operative procedures.

Sedation is typically used for common diagnostic tests that require prolonged immobilization such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed axial tomography (CAT) scanning.The future of anesthetic care involves the simultaneous administration of several drugs including IV medications and inhaled anesthetics.An extensive survey of death in 100,000 cases published in 1988 revealed that death within seven days was 2.9 times greater when one or two anesthetic drugs were used than when using three or more medications.Some cases that require sedation may also necessitate the use of analgesics to decrease pain associated with a procedure or test.Benzodiazepines (common sedative medication) have a cumulative effect.In general, most of the medications that induce sedation may alter breathing and cardiac stability.